CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology 2018; 02(03): S13-S14
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1730682
Abstract

Removal of Embedded Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters Using Endoluminal Balloon Dilatation: A Single-Center Experience

Shahbaz Ahmed Qazi
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Abdul Aziz Harbi
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Omar Bashir
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Yousuf Al Zahrani
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Mohammad Otaibi
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Muhammad Arabi
King Abdul Aziz Medical City National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
› Author Affiliations

Background: Increasing frequency of tunneled hemodialysis catheter usage increases the burden for removal or exchange. A small proportion of dialysis catheter failed to be removed by conventional techniques. Methods: We retrospectively report a series of 12 cases in our institution between September 2015 and December 2017 who failed removal of tunneled dialysis catheters by conventional methods. The study cohort included 11 males and 1 female with mean age of 44 (12–90 years). The mean catheter dwelling time was 770 (153–1442 days). Reason for catheter removal included dysfunctional catheter (n = 5), line sepsis (n = 4), and switching to functioning fistula (n = 1). Catheter types included GlidePath Bard (n = 2), Vaxel Boston Scientific (n = 2), HemoStar Bard PV (n = 2), Palindrome Medtronic (n = 2), Equistream Bard (n = 1), Medcomp (n = 1), and unknown catheter. The insertion sites were internal jugular vein (n = 11) and femoral vein (n = 1). Nine cases were performed under local and 3 under general anesthesia. Single-lumen endoluminal balloon dilatation is done in eight cases and double-lumen dilatation in four cases. Low profile 0.018” or 0.014” balloons ranging from 5–8 mm were used. Results: All catheters were removed safely without any minor or major adverse events. In one case, the catheter was shredded completely but removed over the balloon with no complications. Conclusion: Minimally invasive endoluminal balloon dilatation of tunneled dialysis catheter is a safe and effective technique for removing embedded catheters.



Publication History

Article published online:
11 May 2021

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