CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Indian J Radiol Imaging 2021; 31(01): 086-090
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1729490
Original Article

Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: An Exciting and Problem-Solving Tool in Patients with Hepatic Metastases

Savia Gupta
1  Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
,
Naseer A. Choh
1  Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
,
Mohd Gull Bhatt
2  Department of Medical Oncology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
,
Rauf A. Wani
3  Department of General Surgery, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
,
Zubaida Rasool
4  Department of Pathology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
,
Sheikh R. Rasool
1  Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Background The diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is based on the random Brownian motion of water molecules that influences image contrast depending on different pathological conditions.

Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences including diffusion-weighted and gadobenate-enhanced MRI in the detection and characterization of liver lesions in a patient of known primary malignancy and to compare MRI with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and ultrasonography (USG) in the detection of liver metastases.

Methods All patients underwent a multiphase MRI. The final diagnosis was established by histopathological examination.

Results A total of 43 patients of known primary malignancy were enrolled. MRI gave a provisional diagnosis of liver metastases in 21 patients and benign disease in 22 patients with histopathological correlation revealing two false-negative and one false-positive result. In the detection of lesions, DWI outscored other sequences (92.9 vs. 83.5% in hepatobiliary phase vs. 55.0% in T2-weighted sequences) with a statistically significant difference noted only in comparison with T2-weighted sequences (p < 0.001). In 16 patients, MRI added new lesions that were not detected by CECT/USG. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI for detecting metastases were 90.9%/95.2% and 97.9%/96.8% for per-patient and per-lesion basis, respectively.

Conclusion Multiphase MRI improved both the detection and characterization of liver metastases. Adding DWI to the routine MR sequences helped in detecting small liver metastases (<10 mm) not detected by other sequences.



Publication History

Publication Date:
23 May 2021 (online)

© 2021. Indian Radiological Association. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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