CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurosci Rural Pract 2021; 12(03): 524-529
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1727574
Original Article

Obesity, Migraine, and Overlapping Comorbidities in a Rural Pediatric Population

Suzy M. Walter
1  Department of Family and Community Health, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Zheng Dai
2  Department of Epidemiology, West Virginia University School of Public Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Kesheng Wang
1  Department of Family and Community Health, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding The research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 5U54GM104942-05. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Abstract

Objective This study aims to report the prevalence of obesity and overlapping comorbidities in a rural population of children and adolescents with migraine.

Design and Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive, secondary data analysis using a comprehensive patient database from the West Virginia University (WVU) Medicine Epic Clarity system will be reported. A review of electronic medical records of 990 children and adolescents, ages 7 to 17 years, evaluated for headache at a rural clinic from December 1, 2009 to December 31, 2017 was completed. The Chi-square test was used to identify any differences in demographic characteristics (age, gender, and race) and distribution of comorbidities (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome [OSAS], depression, and anxiety) among obese versus nonobese adolescents with migraine. Student’s t-test was used to identify any differences in the number of comorbidities between the two groups.

Results A total of 648 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of migraine were identified. Approximately 26.4% of the children and adolescents diagnosed with migraine (n = 648) met the criteria for being obese with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 30.6 kg/m2 (standard deviation [SD] = 6.5), ranging from 20.0 to 58.5 kg/m2. There were no significant differences between migraineurs who were categorized as obese versus nonobese in terms of gender (p = 0.8587), age (p = 0.1703), race (p = 0.7655), anxiety (p = 0.1841), or depression (p = 0.2793). Obese individuals have more comorbidities than nonobese individuals (p = 0.015). Additionally, the prevalence of OSAS was significantly higher among obese versus nonobese migraineurs (20 vs. 9.9%, p = 0.0007).

Conclusion Given the prevalence of obesity in rural pediatric populations and the reported neurobiological links between migraine and obesity, BMI needs to be monitored and weight management interventions included in plans of care for rural children and adolescents with migraine.



Publication History

Publication Date:
10 May 2021 (online)

© 2021. Association for Helping Neurosurgical Sick People. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.)

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