J Pediatr Infect Dis 2021; 16(04): 154-159
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1726074
Original Article

Does Having Rotavirus Infection in Early Childhood Increase the Risk of Celiac Disease?

1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Gaziosmanpaşa Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Caner Dogan
2  Department of Pediatrics, Gaziosmanpaşa and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Mahmut Bal
2  Department of Pediatrics, Gaziosmanpaşa and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Seda Geylani Gulec
2  Department of Pediatrics, Gaziosmanpaşa and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Nafiye Urganci
3  Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Sariyer Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective With the increasing prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in the population, possible risk factors are under investigation. Environmental and genetic factors that trigger the immune response have been analyzed for many years. This study investigated the presence of CD in children with rotavirus infection. Rotavirus infection is thought to be a risk factor for CD.

Methods Included in the study were 105 of 160 pediatric patients hospitalized due to symptomatic rotavirus infection between 2012 and 2018. These children were screened for CD 45.6 ± 18.2 (14–90) months following the rotavirus infection diagnosed with CD as per ESPGHAN guidelines.

Results A total of 105 pediatric patients who had rotavirus gastroenteritis were included in the study. The age of the children with rotavirus infection was 3.98 ± 1 (2–6) months. In terms of CD, it was 45.6 ± 18.2 months. Around 14 to 90 months later, patients were called for control. CD developed in four (3.8%) of the children with rotavirus, whereas none of the children in the control group developed CD.

Conclusion Rotavirus infection may be a risk factor for CD through immune mechanisms. There are genetic and various environmental factors for the development of CD. Although the CD's occurrence on children who had rotavirus gastroenteritis in our study also supported this situation, there was no statistically significant difference.

Authors' Contributions

M.K.B. and N.U. designed the study; C.D., M.B., and S.G.G. collected and analyzed the data; M.K.B. wrote the manuscript; S.G.G. gave technical support. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.




Publication History

Received: 06 September 2020

Accepted: 30 January 2021

Publication Date:
23 March 2021 (online)

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