J Pediatr Infect Dis 2021; 16(04): 148-153
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1722973
Original Article

Glutathione Deficiency in HIV-1-Infected Children with Short Stature

Ping Du
1  Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Stephen M. Arpadi
2  Department of Pediatrics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, United States
,
Joshua Muscat
1  Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine, Pennsylvania, United States
,
John P. Richie Jr.
1  Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine, Pennsylvania, United States
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective This study was aimed to determine if glutathione (GSH) deficiency occurs in children with HIV infection and whether GSH deficiency is associated with HIV-related short stature.

Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with two age-matched comparison groups in an inner city hospital-based pediatric AIDS/HIV outpatient clinic. Ten perinatally HIV-infected children aged 6 to 49 months with short stature (height–age percentile ≤5) were studied together with age-matched 10 HIV-infected children with normal height and 10 HIV-seronegative children with normal height. Total erythrocyte GSH (GSH and GSH disulfide) levels were determined by a modification of the 5,5′-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid glutathione disulfide reductase method. Other measures included complete blood counts, lymphocyte subset analysis, plasma albumin, cholesterol, vitamins A and E, and determination of HIV disease stage.

Discussion Erythrocyte GSH levels were lower in HIV-infected children with short stature (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 0.639 µmol/mL ± 0.189) compared with HIV-infected children with normal height (mean ± SD: 0.860 µmol/mL ± 0.358; p < 0.05) and HIV-negative controls (mean ± SD: 0.990 µmol/mL ± 0.343; p < 0.05). Plasma levels of cholesterol, albumin, and vitamins A and E did not differ between the short-stature group and either the HIV-infected normal-height group or HIV-negative controls.

Conclusion These results demonstrate a GSH deficiency in HIV-infected children with short stature and support the hypothesis that GSH balance is important in growth among HIV-infected children.



Publication History

Received: 17 July 2020

Accepted: 13 December 2020

Publication Date:
03 March 2021 (online)

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