Facial Plast Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1722920
Original Article

Pediatric Fronto-Orbital Skull Reconstruction

Andrew M. Ferry
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Rami P. Dibbs
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Shayan M. Sarrami
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Amjed Abu-Ghname
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Han Zhuang Beh
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Renata S. Maricevich
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Edward P. Buchanan
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
› Institutsangaben
Funding None.

Abstract

Craniofacial surgery in children is a highly challenging discipline that requires extensive knowledge of craniofacial anatomy and pathology. Insults to the fronto-orbital skeleton have the potential to inflict significant morbidity and even mortality in patients due to its proximity to the central nervous system. In addition, significant aesthetic and ophthalmologic disturbances frequently accompany these insults. Craniosynostosis, facial trauma, and craniofacial tumors are all pathologies that frequently affect the fronto-orbital region of the craniofacial skeleton in children. While the mechanisms of these pathologies vary greatly, the underlying principles of reconstruction remain the same. Despite the limited data in certain areas of fronto-orbital reconstruction in children, significant innovations have greatly improved its safety and efficacy. It is imperative that further investigations of fronto-orbital reconstruction are undertaken so that craniofacial surgeons may provide optimal care for these patients.



Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
01. Februar 2021 (online)

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