Thromb Haemost 2021; 121(05): 625-640
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1720976
Stroke, Systemic or Venous Thromboembolism

Risk Factors for Central Venous Access Device-Related Thrombosis in Hospitalized Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Lingyun Tian
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
2  School of Nursing, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, China
,
Wan Li
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Yanan Su
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Huimin Gao
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Qiuhong Yang
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Pan Lin
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Liqian Wang
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Jiaqi Zeng
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Yinglan Li
1  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
3  School of Nursing, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, China
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was supported by grants from the Regional Science Fund of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 72064037), the Xiangya Clinical Big Data System Construction Project of Central South University (No. 2013096), and the Surface Project of Natural Science Fund of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (No. 2020D01C149).

Abstract

Objective To identify the potential associations of patient-, treatment-, and central venous access device (CVAD)-related factors with the CVAD-related thrombosis (CRT) risk in hospitalized children.

Methods A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP database was conducted. RevMan 5.3 and Stata 12.0 statistical software were employed for data analysis.

Results In terms of patient-related factors, the patient history of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.57–5.85), gastrointestinal/liver disease (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 0.99–3.46), hematologic disease (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.06–1.99), and cancer (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.01–2.48) were correlated with an increased risk of CRT. In terms of treatment-related factors, parenteral nutrition (PN)/total PN (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.21–2.39), hemodialysis (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.34–3.51), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.31–1.71), and cardiac catheterization (OR = 3.92, 95% CI: 1.06–14.44) were associated with an increased CRT risk, while antibiotics (OR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.32–0.68) was associated with a reduced CRT risk. In terms of the CVAD-related factors, CRT risk was more significantly increased by peripherally inserted central catheter than tunneled lines (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.15–2.85) or totally implantable venous access port (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 1.41–5.60). And subclavian vein catheterization significantly contributed to a lower CRT risk than femoral vein catheterization (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14–0.88). Besides, multiple catheter lines (OR = 4.06, 95% CI: 3.01–5.47), multiple catheter lumens (OR = 3.71, 95% CI: 1.99–6.92), central line-associated bloodstream infection (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.15–6.16), and catheter malfunction (OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.07–2.54) were associated with an increased CRT risk.

Conclusion The exact identification of the effect of risk factors can boost the development of risk assessment tools with stratifying risks.

Authors' Contributions

L.T. was responsible for the design of retrieval strategies, the selection of articles, the extraction of data, the evaluation of evidence quality, the analysis and interpretation of data, the writing of the initial draft and the revision of the manuscript. W.L., Y.S., H.G., Q.Y., P.L., L.W., and J.Z. assisted in the selection of articles, data extraction, the evaluation of evidence quality, the interpretation of data, and the revision of the manuscript. Y.L. conceptualized and designed the systematic review, coordinated and supervised the review, and revised the manuscript. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work.


Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 05 July 2020

Accepted: 23 September 2020

Publication Date:
13 November 2020 (online)

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