J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2022; 83(03): 254-264
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716671
Original Article

Minimally Invasive Approaches to Anterior Skull Base Meningiomas

Scott C. Seaman
1   Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
,
Muhammad S. Ali
1   Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
,
Anthony Marincovich
1   Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
,
Luyuan Li
1   Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
,
Jarrett E. Walsh
2   Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
,
Jeremy D. W. Greenlee
1   Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Objective Anterior skull base meningiomas include olfactory groove, planum sphenoidale, and tuberculum sellae lesions. Traditionally, standard craniotomy approaches have been used to access meningiomas in these locations. More recently, minimally invasive techniques including supraorbital and endonasal endoscopic approaches have gained favor; however there are limited published series comparing the use of these two techniques for these meningiomas. Using our patent database, we identified patients who underwent these two approaches, and conducted a retrospective chart review to compare outcomes between these two techniques.

Methods A total of 32 patients who underwent minimally invasive approaches were identified: 20 supraorbital and 11 endoscopic endonasal. Radiographic images, presenting complaints and outcomes, were analyzed retrospectively. The safety of each approach was evaluated.

Results The mean extent of resection through a supraorbital approach was significantly greater than that of the endoscopic endonasal approach, 88.1 vs. 57.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). Overall, preoperative visual acuity and anopsia deficits were more frequent in the endonasal group that persisted postoperatively (visual acuity: p = 0.004; anopsia: p = 0.011). No major complications including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks or wound-related complications were identified in the supraorbital craniotomy group, while the endonasal group had two CSF leaks requiring lumbar drain placement. Length of stay was shorter in the supraorbital group (3.4 vs. 6.1 days, p < 0.001).

Conclusion Anterior skull base meningiomas can be successfully managed by both supraorbital and endoscopic endonasal approaches. Both approaches provide excellent direct access to tumor in carefully selected patients and are safe and efficient, but patient factors and symptoms should dictate the approach selected.

Note

This work has not been previously published or presented at the time of submission.




Publication History

Received: 30 July 2020

Accepted: 04 August 2020

Article published online:
29 December 2020

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