Journal of Pediatric Neurology
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716345
Case Report

Anti-MOG Antibody Syndrome and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis: A Cause–Effect Hypothesis

Alessandra Fontana
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Postgraduate Training Program in Pediatrics, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Filippo Greco
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Pierluigi Smilari
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Andrea D. Praticò
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Agata Fiumara
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Martino Ruggieri
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
2  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon event of stroke in childhood. Its origin is multifactorial and often it manifests with nonspecific symptoms that may overlap with underlying predisposing factors. Anti–myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody syndrome is a group of recently recognized acquired demyelinating diseases that occur more commonly in children, usually, with a favorable outcome. The association between cerebral venous thrombosis and demyelinating syndrome has been reported but their clinical relationship is matter of debate and various hypotheses have been advanced including intravenous (IV) steroid therapy and/or the consequence of a shared inflammatory-thrombotic process. Herein, we report the case of a child with anti-MOG antibody syndromes who developed a thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and of the right Trolard's vein.

Authors' Contributions

A.F., P.S., F.G., A. F., P.P., and A.D.P. reviewed the literature, critically discussed various aspects of epilepsy in pediatric patients, and read the manuscript.




Publication History

Received: 25 May 2020

Accepted: 25 July 2020

Publication Date:
07 September 2020 (online)

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York