Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2020; 33(06): 409-416
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715605
Original Research

Investigation of Variables Associated with Surgical Site Infection following the Management of Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture with a Lateral Fabellotibial Suture

Thomas Cox
1  Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
,
Thomas W. Maddox
2  Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Institutes of Ageing and Chronic Disease, and Veterinary Science, Liverpool, United Kingdom
,
Robert Pettitt
1  Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
,
Brandan Wustefeld-Janssens
3  Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States
,
John Innes
4  CVS Group PLC, ChesterGates Veterinary Specialists, Telford Court, Gates Road, Chester, United Kingdom
,
Eithne Comerford
2  Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Institutes of Ageing and Chronic Disease, and Veterinary Science, Liverpool, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Objective This study investigated variables associated with surgical site infection (SSI) in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture managed with stifle joint examination and lateral fabellotibial suture stabilization.

Study Design A retrospective study of dogs that had stifle arthroscopy, stifle arthrotomy, or a combination of both, followed by lateral fabellotibial suture stabilization for cranial cruciate ligament rupture. All cases had a minimum follow-up of 90 days. Lameness grades were recorded preoperatively, and at 6-week and final follow-up.

Results One hundred fifty procedures in 130 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Overall, SSI rate was 17.3% and removal of the lateral fabellotibial suture was performed in 53% of SSI. Multivariable analysis showed significant association between SSI and bodyweight (p = 0.013), and induction using propofol (p = 0.029). Multilevel ordinal logistic regression analysis showed a greater proportion of dogs had a higher lameness grade at 6-week (p = 0.021) and final follow-up (p = 0.002) assessments in the infected compared with non-infected dogs.

Conclusion Our study demonstrated a higher SSI incidence than previously reported in dogs undergoing a lateral fabellotibial suture for cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Bodyweight and induction with propofol were identified as significant risk factors for postoperative SSI. Owners could be advised of an increased SSI risk in larger dogs and consideration should be given to selection of induction agent. Dogs that develop an SSI have a worse lameness grade at 6-week and final follow-up.

Authors' Contributions

T.C., B.W.-J. and E.C. contributed to the conception and design of the study, data analysis and data interpretation. T.M. contributed to the data analysis and data interpretation. E.C., R.P. and J.I. contributed to acquisition of data, data analysis and data interpretation. All authors drafted, revised and approved the submitted manuscript.


Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 15 December 2019

Accepted: 08 July 2020

Publication Date:
28 September 2020 (online)

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