Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2020; 33(06): 387-390
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714300
Original Research

Comparative Analysis of Vertical Forces in Dogs Affected with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease and Tibial Plateau Angles Greater or Less than 25 Degrees

Cássio Ricardo Auada Ferrigno
1  Department of Small Animal, Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States
,
Alexandre Navarro Alves de Souza
2  Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil
,
Márcio Poletto Ferreira
3  Departamento de Medicina Animal, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
,
Valentine Verpaalen
1  Department of Small Animal, Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States
,
Julia Maria Matera
4  Departamento de Cirurgia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo (FMVZ-USP), Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective Our objective was to compare the peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) between dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease and a tibial plateau angle (TPA) greater or less than 25 degrees.

Methods A retrospective study was performed in 18 dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease in which kinetic gait data were obtained with a pressure walkway system. Dogs were distributed in two groups: dogs with a TPA ≤ 25 degrees (n = 8) and dogs with a TPA > 25 degrees (n = 10). Mean PVF and VI in per cent of body weight (%BW) were compared between groups with an unpaired t-test (p < 0.05).

Results Mean PVF and VI for the cranial cruciate ligament disease limb were 14.39%BW and 3.57%BWs for dogs with a TPA >25 degrees and 14.44%BW and 3.47%BWs for dogs with a TPA ≤ 25 degrees. There was no significant difference in mean PVF and VI between the groups.

Conclusion The results suggest that there is no difference in kinetic data between dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease and a TPA greater or less than 25 degrees. Other factors such as body weight, time of injury or meniscal lesion could be more related to the magnitude of cranial cruciate ligament disease lameness.

Authors' Contributions

All authors contributed to conception of study, study design and acquisition of data and data analysis and interpretation. All authors drafted, revised and approved the submitted manuscript.




Publication History

Received: 13 August 2019

Accepted: 29 May 2020

Publication Date:
10 August 2020 (online)

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