J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2021; 82(04): 432-436
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714095
Original Article

Straws Don't Suck: Are Straws Dangerous after Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery?

1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Judd H. Fastenberg
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Mindy R. Rabinowitz
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Colin T. Huntley
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Maurits S. Boon
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Gregory A. Epps
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Swar Vimawala
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Chandala Chitguppi
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Jena Patel
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Gurston G. Nyquist
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Marc R. Rosen
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
James J. Evans
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Integra LifeSciences provided financial support in the form of equipment donation.

Abstract

Objective Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery have historically been restricted from using straws postoperatively, due to the concern that this activity generates negative pressure. The objective of this study is to evaluate the pressure dynamics in the sinonasal cavity associated with the use of a straw.

Methods Intracranial pressure catheters were placed in the nasal cavity of 20 healthy individuals. Pressure measurements were then recorded while participants drank liquids of different viscosities from a cup and from a straw. Measurements were recorded with and without subjects occluding their nose to simulate postoperative nasal obstruction.

Results The average pressure in the nasal cavity while drinking water from a cup was −0.86 cmH2O, from a straw was −1.09 cmH2O, and while occluding the nose and using a straw was −0.81 cmH2O. The average pressure in the nasal cavity while drinking a milkshake from a cup was −0.98 cmH2O, from a straw was −1.88 cmH2O, and while occluding the nose and using a straw was −1.37 cmH2O. There was no statistically significant difference in pressure measurements when comparing either task or consistency (p > 0.05).

Conclusion Straw use is not associated with the generation of significant negative pressure in the nasal cavity. The pressure generated when drinking from a straw is not significantly different from that of drinking from a cup. This data suggest that straw use may be safe for patients following endoscopic skull base surgery, but further investigation is warranted.

Meeting Affiliation

Oral presentation at: North American Skull Base Society Meeting, February 7 to 9, 2019, San Antonio, TX.




Publication History

Received: 27 February 2020

Accepted: 30 April 2020

Publication Date:
05 August 2020 (online)

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