Journal of Pediatric Neurology
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714070
Case Report

Phenotypic Variability of an Inherited Pathogenic Variant in CIC Gene: A New Case Report in Two-Generation Family and Literature Review

Sujata Kishnani
1  Division of Medical Genetics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
,
Kacie Riley
1  Division of Medical Genetics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
,
Mohamad A. Mikati
2  Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
,
Yong-hui Jiang
1  Division of Medical Genetics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
3  Department of Neurobiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
4  Program in Genetics and Genomics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

CIC encodes capicua protein, a transcriptional repressor that is highly expressed in developing brains. A previous study has reported pathogenic mutations in the CIC gene in five individuals with significant neurodevelopmental disorders of intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder. All these mutations are either de novo or likely due to germline mosaicism. Here we report a pathogenic mutation (c.2694dupC; p.K899Qfs X32: NM_015125) in the CIC gene in three members of a two-generation family presenting with neurodevelopmental impairment but has significant phenotypic variability. Interestingly, loss of function variants of somatic origin are frequently found in cancers of brain and other organs. We summarize germline and somatic pathogenic or loss of function variants in CIC gene in public genome databases through in silico analysis and published literature. Our findings provide further evidence to support the review of haploinsufficiency of CIC in neurodevelopmental disorder, in addition to suggesting a strong modifier effect for the CIC mutations.

Current Contact: Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, Office: WWW 313 PO Box 208005, United States.


Note

The informed consent was obtained for this study and publication.


Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 01 April 2020

Accepted: 24 May 2020

Publication Date:
20 August 2020 (online)

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