CC BY 4.0 · Surg J (N Y) 2020; 06(03): e145-e152
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712542
Original Article

Improvement in Hemorrhoidal Disease Surgery Outcomes Using a New Anatomical/Clinical–Therapeutic Classification (A/CTC)

Gabriele Naldini
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Filippo Caminati
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Alessandro Sturiale
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Bernardina Fabiani
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Danilo Cafaro
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Claudia Menconi
1  Proctology and Pelvic Floor Clinical Centre, University Hospital, Pisa, Italy
,
Domenico Mascagni
2  Department of Surgical Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
,
Felipe Celedon Porzio
3  Cirugia Coloproctologica, Hospital de la Fuerza Aerea de Chile, Santiago de, Chile
› Author Affiliations
  

Abstract

Introduction The introduction and diffusion of new techniques for hemorrhoidal surgery have made it clear how much Goligher classification is inadequate in the modern times, lacking in any correlation between anatomical and clinical features to a surgical procedure. The aim of the study was to evaluate if the application of a new classification of hemorrhoidal diseases might lead to an improvement in the postoperative surgical outcomes.

Methods From January 2014 to December 2015, all patients undergoing surgery for hemorrhoidal disease were enrolled. The procedures performed were based upon a new anatomical/clinical–therapeutic classification (A/CTC) considering these items: anatomical presentation, symptom types and frequency, associated diseases, and available surgical treatments and their related contraindications. The new classification identified four groups: A (outpatient), B, C, and D (surgical approaches). The overall outcomes were assessed and then stratified by surgical groups. These data were then analyzed in comparison with the published data about all the surgical procedures performed.

Results A total of 381 patients underwent surgery and they were stratified as follows: Group B (39), C (202), and D (140). Group B underwent Doppler-guided dearterialization with mucopexies or tissue selective therapy, Group C stapled procedures, and Group D hemorrhoidectomy. The mean follow-up was 30 months. The overall outcomes were: success rate 92.4%, recurrences 7.6%, postoperative complications 4.8%, long-term complications 5.4%, and reoperation rate 2.7%. The success rates stratified by groups were: B, 85%); C, 91.4%; and D, 95.7%.

Conclusion The A/CTC proved to be useful in stratifying the patients and choosing the proper treatment for each case. This classification seems to improve the outcome of different surgical procedures if compared with those already published.

Financial Disclosure

None reported.


Authorship

Gabriele Naldini, Filippo Caminati, and Alessandro Sturiale contributed to the conception and design of the study. Gabriele Naldini, Filippo Caminati, Alessandro Sturiale, Bernardina Fabiani, and Claudia Menconi contributed to the acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of data and revision. Danilo Cafaro and Felipe Celedon Porzio contributed in data analysis. Domenico Mascagni, Gabriele Naldini, Alessandro Sturiale, and Bernardina Fabiani contributed to the final approval of the version to be published.




Publication History

Received: 01 May 2019

Accepted: 24 March 2020

Publication Date:
10 September 2020 (online)

© 2020. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, permitting unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction so long as the original work is properly cited. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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