CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Journal of Digestive Endoscopy 2019; 10(04): 246-247
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710157
Endoscopy Video

A Rare Case of Buried Sharp Foreign Body (Metal Pin) Partly in Gastric Wall and Partly Outside in Gallbladder Fossa—Endoscopic Submucosal Incision and Fluoroscopy Guided Removal

Pankaj Desai
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Mayank Kabrawala
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Subhash Nandwani
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Rajiv Mehta
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Chintan Patel
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Parika Kalra
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Ritesh Prajapati
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
,
Nisharg Patel
1  Department of Endoscopy and EUS, Surat Institute of Digestive Sciences, Surat, Gujarat, India
› Author Affiliations

Case

A 27-year-old male, presented with right upper abdominal pain, nausea and one episode of nonbilious vomiting. He had a history of accidental ingestion of sharp metal pin 15 days back. Patient was admitted at outside hospital for 15 days and was advised close clinical observation and conservative medical management. Multiple serial X-rays over the course of hospital stay revealed persistent position of foreign body in stomach ([Fig. 1]). Patient was discharged on supportive medical treatment. His symptoms persisted and hence he was then referred to our institute.

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Fig. 1 X-ray abdomen showing foreign body in stomach.

A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) abdomen was done which revealed “a foreign body in the pyloric region of the stomach with its distal end extending into gall bladder fossa with very minimal adjacent free fluid and few small adjacent air foci (perforation; [Fig. 2]).

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Fig. 2 CECT abdomen revealed “a foreign body in the pyloric region of the stomach with its distal end extending into gall bladder fossa with minimal adjacent free fluid and air foci (perforation). CECT, contrast-enhanced computed tomography.


Publication History

Publication Date:
08 May 2020 (online)

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