CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2021; 25(02): e279-e283
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1709117
Original Research

Level I Nodal Positivity as a Factor for Involvement of the Submandibular Gland in Oral Cavity Carcinoma: A Case Series Report

1  Section of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
,
Rahim Dhanani*
1  Section of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
,
1  Section of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
,
2  Department of Biological & Biomedical Sciences, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
,
3  Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
4  Surgical Specialties Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
› Institutsangaben

Abstract

Introduction The routine practice of neck dissection in the surgical management of oral carcinoma has evolved into a more functionally conservative approach. Over time, the rationale for removal of the submandibular gland has been questioned. Routine extirpation of the submandibular gland can aggravate the xerostomia experienced by many patients, significantly affecting their quality of life.

Objective The objective of the present study was to determine the incidence of submandibular gland metastases in oral cavity carcinoma and to identify possible factors that may affect their involvement.

Methods A total of 149 cases of oral carcinoma presenting at a private tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, over the course of 1 year were reviewed retrospectively.

Results Histopathological data showed that the submandibular gland was involved in 7 (4.7%) cases. Involvement of level I lymph nodes was found in all of the cases. Direct extension of primary tumor was noted in two cases when the primary tumor was in the floor of the mouth.

Conclusion The results suggest that preservation of the submandibular gland during neck dissection for oral carcinoma can be practiced safely when there is no evidence of direct extension of the primary tumor toward the submandibular gland or when there is no clinical or radiological evidence of neck disease in level I. Presence of pathological lymph nodes in level I requires caution when contemplating preservation of the submandibular gland.

Presented In

Poster presentation at the American Head and Neck Society (AHNS) 2018 Annual Meeting held during the Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meetings (CSOM) on 18–19 April, 2018.


* These authors contributed equally to this work.




Publikationsverlauf

Eingereicht: 29. November 2019

Angenommen: 30. Januar 2020

Publikationsdatum:
30. Juni 2020 (online)

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