CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Journal of Health and Allied Sciences NU 2017; 07(01): 045-051
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708695
Original Article

Cephalometric Norms for Orthognathic Surgery in Kerala Population

Murali Patla
1  Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, NITTE University, Deralakatte, Mangalore -
,
Sonika Achalli
2  Lecturer, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, NITTE University, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575018
,
K. Saidath
3  Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, NITTE University, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575018
,
Crystal Runa Soans
4  Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, NITTE University, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575018
,
U.S. Krishna Nayak
5  Principal and Dean, Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, NITTE University, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575018
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Background and objectives: The successful treatment of orthognathic surgical patient is dependent on careful diagnosis. The first step in the diagnosis of the patient for orthognathic surgery is to determine the nature of the skeletal, dental and soft tissue defects. Cephalometrics for orthognathic surgery (COGS) analysis by Burstone and colleagues is especially adapted for the diagnosis and treatment planning of orthognathic surgery cases. Burstone and colleagues' COGS analysis are based on Caucasian whites; they may not be applicable as a reference for the diagnosis and treatment of Kerala population patients. Therefore it has become important to determine the cephalometric parameters for this ethnic group.

Methodology: Cephalometric radiographs of 50 Keralite adults (25 Males and 25 Females) were analysed who met criteria of the study. The Mean values of various skeletal, dental, angular and linear measurements of Keralites were compared with the White Americans values, originally obtained by Burstone.

Results: Statistically significant differences were found in the Keralite samples, who had a greater Anterior and Posterior Cranial base length, Mandibular protrusion, Lower anterior facial heights, Anterior and Posterior Dental heights, Proclined Upper and Lower incisor with less Prominent Chin in comparison to Caucasian.

Interpretation and conclusion: This is indicative of disparity between cephalometric norms of Caucasians and Keralites. However conclusions can't be drawn from a single study, hence further studies to establish the cephalometric norms for different ethnic groups across the country may be advisable.



Publication History

Received: 26 October 2016

Accepted: 02 February 2017

Publication Date:
22 April 2020 (online)

© .

Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.
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