Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2020; 33(04): 252-257
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708497
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Biomechanical Comparison of Two Conical Coupling Plate Constructs for Cat Tibial Fracture Stabilization

Sandra L. MacArthur
1  Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, United States
,
1  Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, United States
,
Daniel D. Lewis
1  Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Fixin conical coupling implants and financial support for this project were provided by Intrauma, Rivoli, Italy.
Further Information

Publication History

26 November 2018

21 January 2020

Publication Date:
21 April 2020 (online)

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to compare the biomechanical characteristics of two conical coupling plate (CCP) constructs in an ex vivo feline tibial fracture gap model.

Study Design Paired tibiae harvested from eight recently euthanatized cats were alternately assigned to one of two stabilization groups. One tibia was stabilized with a standard, 6-hole, 2.5-mm CCP and the contralateral tibia was stabilized with a 6-hole, 2.5-mm prototype CCP (pCCP). Non-destructive cyclic four-point craniocaudal bending, mediolateral bending and axial compression testing were performed, and stiffness was recorded. The specimens were then loaded to failure in axial compression, and yield and failure loads were recorded.

Results During non-destructive testing, the pCCP constructs were significantly stiffer than the CCP constructs in both modes of bending and axial loading. Both constructs demonstrated significantly greater craniocaudal bending stiffness compared with mediolateral bending. Yield load and failure load were significantly greater for the pCCP constructs.

Conclusion The augmented design of the pCCP yielded superior mechanical characteristics during both non-destructive and destructive testings compared with constructs employing standard CCP. The more rigid design of the pCCP suggests that this implant may be better at withstanding greater loads, particularly when applied in a bridging fashion, during the postoperative convalescence. Further investigations are warranted to prospectively evaluate the clinical performance of the pCCP.

Authors' Contributions

Matthew D. Johnson and Daniel D. Lewis were responsible for the study conception and design. Sandra L. MacArthur, Matthew D. Johnson and Daniel D. Lewis were involved in the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data. All authors were involved in the drafting or revising of the manuscript and all approved of the submitted version.