J Pediatr Intensive Care 2020; 09(03): 222-224
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1705182
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood with H1N1 Infection

Lalit Takia
1  Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Nilamani Patra
1  Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Karthi Nallasamy
1  Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Lokesh Saini
2  Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Renu Suthar
2  Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Suresh K. Angurana
1  Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
,
Muralidharan Jayashree
1  Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 November 2019

31 January 2020

Publication Date:
06 March 2020 (online)

Abstract

Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is an uncommon and fulminant complication of seasonal influenza infection associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We report a 4.5-year-old female who had pneumonia, ANEC, and raised intracranial pressure (ICP) with polymerase chain reaction proven H1N1 infection. Management included mechanical ventilation, invasive monitoring and control of ICP, oseltamivir, methylprednisolone, and supportive care in pediatric intensive care unit. She survived with poor neurological status at discharge.