CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Journal of Health and Allied Sciences NU 2014; 04(03): 099-100
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1703811
Original Article

PARTIALY FUSED SPLENIC LOBULE- A CASE REPORT

Rani Nallathamby
1  P.G. Student, Department of Anatomy, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore - 575 018, Karnataka, India
,
Ramakrishna Avadhani
2  HOD, Department of Anatomy, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore - 575 018, Karnataka, India
,
Shivarama Bhat
3  Professor, Department of Anatomy, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore - 575 018, Karnataka, India
,
Meera Jacob
4  Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore - 575 018, Karnataka, India
,
Meril Ann Soman
5  P.G. Student, Department of Anatomy, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore - 575 018, Karnataka, India
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Spleen is the largest lymphatic organ in humans. It is situated in the left hypochondrium and partly in the epigastrium, between the fundus of the stomach and the diaphragm. It consists of large encapsulated mass of lymphoid and vascular tissues (1). We encountered a case of partially fused splenic lobule in the anterior end with attachment to the main splenic mass through a stalk of splenic tissue. As such, the variation of this kind is rare and had various important clinical implications in the field of surgery, radio diagnosis and gastroenterology.



Publication History

Publication Date:
26 April 2020 (online)

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