CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) 2020; 55(05): 625-628
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1702960
Artigo Original
Trauma

Firearm-Related Fractures: Epidemiology and Infection Rate[*]

Article in several languages: português | English
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
,
Auro Sérgio Perdigão de Brito
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
,
Maíra Soares Torres
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
,
Kassio Lohner Prado
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
,
Marco Antonio Percope de Andrade
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
,
Tulio Vinicius de Oliveira Campos
1  Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brasil
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective To investigate the incidence of infection in patients with gunshot-related fractures, and to correlate this finding with the occurrence of surgical debridement in the emergency room.

Methods A retrospective, observational, descriptive study that included all cases of fractures caused by firearms between January 2010 and December 2014; 245 fractures in 223 patients were included.

Results There was surgical-site infection in 8.5% of the fractures, and the mean number of debridements required to control the infectious process was of 1.273 ± 0.608. A correlation was identified between the surgical treatment chosen and the affected body segment (p < 0.001). The surgical treatment in the emergency room had a correlation with the occurrence of infection (p < 0.001; Chi-squared test).

Conclusion Patients with gunshot injuries treated non-operatively presented less severe and stable lesions; thus, the incidence of complications in this group was found to be lower. On the other hand, those patients with complex lesions underwent debridement and external fixation. Therefore, a greater number of infectious complications in patients submitted to external fixation was found, as expected.

* The data was collected in Hospital Risoleta Tolentino Neves, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.




Publication History

Received: 21 May 2019

Accepted: 29 November 2019

Publication Date:
27 April 2020 (online)

© 2020. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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