CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Organic Materials 2020; 02(02): 064-070
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1702148
Short Communication
The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). (2020) The Author(s).

Consecutive Three-Component Synthesis of Donor-Substituted Merocyanines by a One-Pot Suzuki–Knoevenagel Condensation Sequence

Tim Meyer
a  Institut für Organische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
,
a  Institut für Organische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was funded by Evonik Stiftung and Fonds der Chemischen Industrie.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 29 October 2019

Accepted after revision: 17 December 2019

Publication Date:
06 April 2020 (online)


Abstract

The consecutive three-component Suzuki-Knoevenagel condensation (SuKnoCon) synthesis is an efficient, modular one-pot synthetic approach to donor-substituted merocyanines with carboxylic acid functionality. A library of 19 dyes is readily accessible and their electronic properties can be assessed by cyclic voltammetry and absorption and emission spectroscopy. In addition, for illustration of the utility of this concise one-pot concept, several dyes from this library were identified to be well suited as DSSC dyes with relative efficiencies reaching up to 93% of Grätzel's dye N3.

Supporting Information

Supporting information for this article is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1702148.


Supporting Information

 
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