CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Yearb Med Inform 2020; 29(01): 247-252
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701978
Research & Education
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart

Freedom of Master's Degree Students to Study in Health Curricula: Switching to Optimized Blended Learning as a Solution!

Lionel Di Marco
1  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS / TIMC-IMAG Lab., UMR 5525 (Themas), Grenoble, France
,
Jean Breton
2  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS, IRIG-SyMMES, Grenoble, France
,
Donald K. Martin
3  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS / TIMC-IMAG Lab., UMR 5525 (SyNaBi), Grenoble, France
,
Patrice Morand
4  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Dean Executive Board, Medical School, Grenoble, France
,
Pierre Gillois
1  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS / TIMC-IMAG Lab., UMR 5525 (Themas), Grenoble, France
4  Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Dean Executive Board, Medical School, Grenoble, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
17 April 2020 (online)

Summary

Objectives: The Grenoble (France) Master's degree in health includes 17 sub-specialty programs, 120 separate teaching units (TUs) and caters for up to 400 students per year. We present the pedagogical transition to blended learning based on flipped classroom initiated in 2010 to overcome the pedagogical limitations of classical lectures.

Methods: The pedagogical organization of each TU is based on the weekly and sequential implementation of five sequences. The first three sequences comprise the learning stages of (1) self-learning on knowledge capsules, (2) interactive on-line questions and votes of interest, and (3) interactive on-site training and explanation meetings. The last two sequences include the evaluation stages with (4) positioning tests, and (5) an anonymous evaluation of the TU allowing access to personalized follow-ups. This pedagogical sequence is completed with a final certification on a tablet computer.

Results: The systematic evaluation and debriefing sessions of TUs gave us a clear SWOT vision of the revised Master's degree in health. The feedback was very positive from students, teachers, and the institution, which encourages us to move forward in this transition. Nonetheless, some of this positive feedback was unexpected, such as the ease of managing mobile learners (e.g. Erasmus, International internship) or personalized reinforcement.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that a switch to blended learning is feasible in a large Master program, with improvements on student/teacher equity and for the institution.