CC BY 4.0 · TH Open 2020; 04(01): e12-e19
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701205
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Determinants of Serum- and Plasma Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Concentrations in a Healthy Study Group

Günter Daum
1  Clinic and Polyclinic for Vascular Medicine, University Heart and Vascular Center, Hamburg, Germany
2  German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck (GD, ES, MvL) and Greifswald (EM), Berlin, Germany
,
Martin Winkler
3  Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
4  Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medicine, Göttingen, Germany
,
Eileen Moritz
2  German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck (GD, ES, MvL) and Greifswald (EM), Berlin, Germany
5  Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
6  Institute of Pharmacology, Department of General Pharmacology, University Medicine, Greifswald, Germany
,
Tina Müller
7  Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Center for Sepsis Control and Care (CSCC), and the Center for Molecular Biomedicine (CMB), Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany
,
Maria Geffken
8  Institute for Transfusion Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg, Eppendorf, Germany
,
Mirjam von Lucadou
2  German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck (GD, ES, MvL) and Greifswald (EM), Berlin, Germany
5  Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
,
Munif Haddad
9  Institute for Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Hamburg, Eppendorf, Germany
,
Sven Peine
8  Institute for Transfusion Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg, Eppendorf, Germany
,
Rainer H. Böger
5  Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
,
Axel Larena-Avellaneda
1  Clinic and Polyclinic for Vascular Medicine, University Heart and Vascular Center, Hamburg, Germany
,
Eike Sebastian Debus
1  Clinic and Polyclinic for Vascular Medicine, University Heart and Vascular Center, Hamburg, Germany
,
Markus Gräler
7  Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Center for Sepsis Control and Care (CSCC), and the Center for Molecular Biomedicine (CMB), Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany
,
2  German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck (GD, ES, MvL) and Greifswald (EM), Berlin, Germany
5  Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Funding This project was supported by the German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) and by the Förderverein of the University Heart and Vascular Center.
Further Information

Publication History

10 September 2019

18 December 2019

Publication Date:
23 January 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

Introduction To correctly interpret plasma- or serum-sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) concentrations measured in clinical studies it is critical to understand all major determinants in healthy controls.

Methods Serum- and plasma-S1P from 174 healthy blood donors was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and correlated to clinical laboratory data. Selected plasma samples, 10 with high and 10 with low S1P concentrations, were fractionated into very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-, and lipoprotein-free fractions. S1P was then measured in each fraction to determine its distribution.

Results The mean S1P concentration in serum (1.04 ± 0.24 nmol/mL) was found 39% higher compared with plasma (0.75 ± 0.16 nmol/mL) and overall was not different between men and women. Only when stratified for age and gender, older women were found to exhibit higher circulatory S1P levels than men. In plasma, S1P levels correlate to red blood cell (RBC) counts but not to platelet counts. Conversely, serum-S1P correlates to platelet counts but not to RBC counts. In addition, eosinophil counts are strongly associated with serum-S1P concentrations. Both serum- and plasma-S1P correlate to total cholesterol but not to HDL-C. The distribution of S1P between VLDL-, LDL-, HDL-, and lipoprotein-free fractions is independent of total plasma-S1P concentrations. S1P concentrations in HDL but not in LDL are highly variable.

Conclusion These data indicate S1P concentrations in plasma and serum to be differentially associated with cell counts and S1P carrier proteins. Besides platelets, eosinophil counts are identified as a novel determinant for serum-S1P concentrations further suggesting a role for S1P in eosinophil pathologies.

Supplementary Material