Journal of Pediatric Neurology
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701204
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Predictors of Neurological Outcome of Arterial Ischemic Stroke in Children

1  Department of Medicine, David Tvildiani Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
2  Department of Neuroscience, M. Iashvili Children's Central Hospital, Tbilisi, Georgia
,
1  Department of Medicine, David Tvildiani Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
2  Department of Neuroscience, M. Iashvili Children's Central Hospital, Tbilisi, Georgia
,
1  Department of Medicine, David Tvildiani Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
2  Department of Neuroscience, M. Iashvili Children's Central Hospital, Tbilisi, Georgia
,
3  Department of Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology and Neuropsychology, Tbilisi, Georgia
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation Grant N°PhD_F_17_121.
Further Information

Publication History

11 November 2019

12 December 2019

Publication Date:
09 February 2020 (online)

Abstract

Stroke is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children. The aim of the study was to evaluate long-term neurological outcome in children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) and explore predictive factors that affect poor outcome. Fifty-six patients aged between 1 month and 17 years who were treated at M. Iashvili Children's Central Hospital, Tbilisi, Georgia, with an onset of stroke from 2007 to 2017 were included. To explore predictive factors of outcome, the following data were collected: demographic characteristics, risk factors, he presenting signs, radiological features, and presence of stroke recurrence. Neurological status at discharge and long-term neurological outcome at least 1 year after stroke was evaluated according to Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure subscale. The reported outcome after childhood stroke was variable with long-term neurological deficits in one-third of patients (30.4%). The neurological outcome was worse in males, in patients with multiple stroke episodes, and in those with infarctions involving a combination of cortical and subcortical areas. Pediatric AIS carries the risk of long-term morbidity, and neuroimaging has a predictive influence on outcome.