Semin Neurol 2020; 40(01): 049-058
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3402733
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: What We Do and Do Not Know

Daniele Nuti
1  Department of Otology and Skull Base Surgery, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
,
David S. Zee
2  Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
3  Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
4  Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
5  Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Marco Mandalà
1  Department of Otology and Skull Base Surgery, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
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Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
14. Januar 2020 (online)

Abstract

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is common, sometimes terrifying, but rarely portends serious disease. It is usually easily diagnosed and treated, and both the patient and the physician are immediately gratified. While much has been learned about the pathogenesis of BPPV in the past decades, many of its features remain mysterious, and one must still be wary of the rare times it mimics a dangerous brain disorder. Here we review common, relatively well understood clinical features of BPPV but also emphasize what we do not know and when the physician must look deeper for a more ominous cause.