CC BY 4.0 · European J Pediatr Surg Rep 2019; 07(01): e93-e95
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400275
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Prenatal Diagnosis and Management

Fabrizio Vatta
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Alessandro Raffaele
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Noemi Pasqua
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Stefania Cesari
2  Department of Pathology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Stud di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Piero Romano
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Gian Battista Parigi
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

25 February 2019

20 September 2019

Publication Date:
13 December 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Prepubertal primary testicular tumors account for ∼1% of all pediatric solid tumors. We report a new case of prenatal diagnosis of juvenile-type granulosa cell tumor (JGCT). A fetal ultrasound performed at the 38th week of gestation for suspected nonvertex presentation identified a left multilocular septated cystic testicular mass, suggestive for JGCT. At birth, a painless left scrotal mass was detected. Ultrasound re-evaluation excluded torsion of the testis. Tumor markers and abdominal ultrasound were normal for age. Inguinal exploration revealed a cystic mass beneath the tunica albuginea that had replaced all the normal parenchyma. Since organ-sparing surgery was thus not feasible, an orchiectomy was performed and diagnosis of JGCT was confirmed. At 7-year follow-up, the child presented an uneventful outcome. Our case shows that neonatal JGCT, which has an intrauterine genesis, can be diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound in the last weeks of pregnancy.