CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2019; 80(S 04): S365-S367
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698823
Skull Base: Operative Videos
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Midline Suboccipital Subtonsillar Approach with C1 Laminectomy for Resection of Foramen Magnum Meningioma: 2-Dimensional Operative Video

1  Department of Neurological Surgery, Eberhard-Karls-University, University Hospital, Tübingen, Germany
2  Department of Neurological Surgery, Microsurgical Neuroanatomy Lab, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Maximiliano Nunez
2  Department of Neurological Surgery, Microsurgical Neuroanatomy Lab, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Rocio Evangelista-Zamora
1  Department of Neurological Surgery, Eberhard-Karls-University, University Hospital, Tübingen, Germany
,
Marcos Tatagiba
1  Department of Neurological Surgery, Eberhard-Karls-University, University Hospital, Tübingen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 May 2019

24 August 2019

Publication Date:
28 October 2019 (online)

Abstract

We present a case of a medium-sized foramen magnum meningioma that was resected through a midline suboccipital subtonsillar approach with C1 laminectomy in prone (Concorde) position. The patient is a 77-year-old woman with a 6-month history of intermittent vertigo, moderate gait instability, and slight decline of memory.

On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) an extra-axial intradural lesion was discovered that originated from the right epicondylar region just inferior to the jugular tubercle and occupied the anterolateral aspect of the foramen magnum. There was moderate transposition and compression of the medulla at the level of the cerebellar tonsils.

On physical examination the patient was ambulatory independently without motor weakness but exhibited some gait instability. The function of the lower cranial nerves was preserved.

A gross-total resection was achieved, histopathology confirmed a WHO grade-I meningothelial meningioma with a low-proliferation index. The patient was discharged home 5 days after surgery, her gait instability improved significantly immediately after surgery and had resolved completely after 2 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. There was no other neurological deficit. At 3-month follow-up MRI, there was no indication of meningioma residual or recurrence.

In summary, the midline suboccipital subtonsillar approach is a powerful tool with limited morbidity in the armamentarium for the microsurgical management of a variety of pathologies residing in the posterior cranial fossa and the craniocervical junction. Oftentimes the space created by the pathology opens up corridors that can be exploited for microsurgical access to avoid more extensive surgical approaches.

The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/0uUxs13ze7w.