CC BY 4.0 · European J Pediatr Surg Rep 2019; 07(01): e72-e74
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698403
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Iatrogenic Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Burn Dressing in a 2-Year-Old Child

Carlos Delgado-Miguel
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Antonio Jesus Muñoz-Serrano
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Miriam Miguel-Ferrero
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Karla Estefanía Rodríguez
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
María Velayos
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Mercedes Diaz
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Juan Carlos López-Gutiérrez
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 May 2019

20 August 2019

Publication Date:
31 October 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

We report a severe case of compartment syndrome due to a compressive burn dressing. An otherwise healthy 2-year-old girl presented at her local health center with a superficial partial-thickness thermal burn on the dorsum of the mid phalanx of the second finger of her right hand. A compressive dressing was applied solely to the affected finger. Forty-eight hours afterward, the patient presented in the emergency room with severe pain of the finger. After removal of the dressing, a circular constrictive eschar was observed at the base of the finger, secondary to ischemia due to the compressive dressing. Emergent lateral escharotomies were performed, with immediate recovery of distal perfusion. One week afterward, the patient underwent surgical debridement of the burn on the dorsum of her finger and escharectomy of the ischemic eschar at the base. The lesions were covered with partial-thickness skin grafts. This case shows that acute compartment syndrome can lead to severe sequelae, such as the loss of an extremity or body segment. We must take utmost care in all our actions to avoid any (negligent) act that could lead to severe or permanent damage to our patients.