CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurol Surg B
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697977
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Surgical Management of Chiari Malformations: Preliminary Results of Surgery According to the Mechanisms of Ptosis of the Brain Stem and Cerebellum

Misao Nishikawa
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Moriguchi-Ikuno Memorial Hospital, Koudoukai Health System, Osaka, Japan
2  The Chiari Institute, North Shore University Hospital, New York, United States
3  Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
,
Paolo A. Bolognese
2  The Chiari Institute, North Shore University Hospital, New York, United States
4  Chiari Neurosurgical Center, Long Island, New York, United State
,
Roger W. Kula
2  The Chiari Institute, North Shore University Hospital, New York, United States
4  Chiari Neurosurgical Center, Long Island, New York, United State
,
Hiromichi Ikuno
5  Department of Neuroradiology, Moriguchi-Ikuno Memorial Hospital, Koudoukai Health System, Osaka, Japan
,
Toshihiro Takami
3  Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
,
Kenji Ohata
3  Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

01 June 2019

11 August 2019

Publication Date:
30 September 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Introduction We classified Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) according to the mechanism of ptosis of the brain stem and cerebellum, based on a morphometric study of the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) and craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Surgery was performed to manage the mechanism of the hindbrain ptosis.

Materials and Methods We calculated the volume of the PCF (VPCF) and the area surrounding the foramen magnum (VSFM) and measured the axial length of the enchondral parts of the occipital bone (occipital bone size) and the hindbrain. According to these measures, we classified CM-I into type A (normal VPCF, normal VSFM, and normal occipital bone size), type B (normal VPCF, small VSFM, and small occipital bone size), and type C (small VPCF, small VSFM, and small occipital bone size). Foramen magnum decompression (FMD) (280 cases) was performed on CM-I types A and B. Expansive suboccipital cranioplasty (ESCP) was performed on CM-I type C. Posterior craniocervical fixation (CCF) was performed in cases with CVJ instability. Lysis of the adhesion and/or sectioning of the filum terminale were performed on cases with tethered cord syndrome.

Results Both ESCP and FMD had a high rate of improvement of neurological symptoms (87%) and recovery rate. There was only small number of complications. CCF had a high rate of improvement of neurological symptoms (88%) and joint stabilization.

Conclusion In the management of Chiari malformation, appropriate surgical methods that address ptosis of the hindbrain should be chosen. Each surgical approach resulted in a good improvement of neurological symptoms.

Note

This study has been approved by Institutional Review Boards of Koudoukai Health System, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan, and North Shore University Hospital–Long Island Jewish Health System, New York, United States.