CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) 2020; 55(01): 095-099
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697969
Artigo original
Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia. Published by Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Panorama of Infiltration for Painful Shoulder Among Shoulder Specialists[*]

Article in several languages: português | English
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Vitor Luis Pereira
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Ronaldo Roncetti Júnior
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Leandro Masini Ribeiro
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Benno Ejnisman
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Paulo Santoro Belangero
1  Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte, Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

20 March 2018

02 July 2018

Publication Date:
19 December 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective To assess how shoulder specialists have used infiltration in their daily practice.

Methods A survey study in which shoulder and elbow specialists answered a questionnaire on the use of infiltration in painful shoulders.

Results Most of the doctors (45.9%) have > 10 years of experience in the area and have carried out up to 10 infiltrations in the last 12 months. The main indications for glenohumeral and subacromial infiltration are glenohumeral arthrosis and rotator cuff tendinopathy, respectively. The most used portals are the posterior (52.2%) for glenohumeral infiltration and the lateral (57.5%) for subacromial infiltration. The majority of the doctors (752%) infiltrate in an outpatient setting without imaging methods, and the most commonly used drug is the combination of corticoid and anesthetic. The main contraindication cited is the presence of diabetes, and the most common complication is pain after infiltration.

Conclusion Subacromial infiltrations are indicated especially for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathies and bursitis, performed by the lateral portal, in an outpatient setting, with low index of long-term complications. Glenohumeral infiltrations are indicated especially for glenohumeral arthrosis, with a combination of a corticoid and anesthetic, performed mostly in an outpatient setting.

* Study developed at the Sports Traumatology Center (CETE), Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Federal University of São Paulo (DOT-UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.


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