CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · AJP Rep 2019; 09(04): e366-e371
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1695746
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Pyelonephritis in Pregnancy: Relationship of Fever and Maternal Morbidity

Tracey H. DeYoung
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia
,
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas
,
Christopher S. Ennen
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia
,
Aaron T. Poole
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 February 2019

09 July 2019

Publication Date:
19 November 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the relationship between maternal fever at the time of hospital admission and subsequent maternal morbidity in pregnant patients with pyelonephritis.

Study Design In this retrospective cohort study, inpatient records were reviewed for all obstetric patients discharged from a single tertiary care hospital between June 1, 2011, and May 30, 2017, with the diagnosis of pyelonephritis. Patients were stratified into two groups, those with and without fever at the time of admission. Descriptive statistics were utilized to evaluate the association of fever at the time of presentation with subsequent morbidity. Using admission vital signs, maternal early warning criteria (MEWC) were applied and odds ratios calculated to predict intensive care unit (ICU) admission.

Results A total of 110 patients were admitted with pyelonephritis in pregnancy; 24 patients were febrile and 86 patients were afebrile on admission. There was no difference in rates of maternal ICU admission between both groups. Positive MEWC was predictive of ICU admission with an adjusted odds ratio of 16.54 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–212.5; p = 0.03).

Conclusion Afebrile pregnant patients with pyelonephritis remain at risk of significant maternal morbidity. Application of the MEWC on admission identifies patients at higher risk of ICU admission.

Note

I am a military service member. This work was prepared as part of my official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that “Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States government.” Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines a United States government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties.


The study protocol was approved by the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Institutional Review Board in compliance with all applicable Federal regulations governing the protection of human subjects.


Research data derived from an approved Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, Virginia IRB, protocol; number NMCP.2017.0061.