J Pediatr Intensive Care 2020; 09(01): 012-015
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1695045
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Botulism in the Pediatric Intensive Care Units in the United States: Interrogating a National Database

Cynthia Howes
1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Kerith Hiatt
1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Katherine Turlington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Adrian Holloway
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Ana Lia Graciano
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Jason Custer
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Dayanand Bagdure
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 May 2019

11 July 2019

Publication Date:
28 August 2019 (online)

Abstract

Botulism in children can have severe complications necessitating intensive care. The current literature lacks data of children with botulism requiring critical care. We aim to describe the outcomes of pediatric botulism in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Retrospective cohort data from Virtual Pediatric Systems (VPS, LLC, Los Angeles, California), from 2009 to 2016 including all PICU admissions among children with botulism, were analyzed. Characteristics and outcomes were compared with similar studies. A total of 380 children were identified over 8 years. Our cohort had the shortest length of stay (median 4.6 days), the smallest percent requiring mechanical ventilation (40%), and the highest median age (120 days) amongst comparable studies. Length of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay has decreased among children with botulism. Advances in PICU care may have contributed to these improved outcomes.