J Neurol Surg B
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694967
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinuses: A Single Center Experience

1  Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway
2  Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
,
Terje Osnes
2  Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
3  Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway
,
Åse Bratland
4  Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway
,
Torstein R. Meling
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway
2  Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
5  Service de Neurochirurgie, Département des Neurosciences Cliniques, Hopitaux Universitaires de Genève, Genève, Switzerland
6  Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
› Author Affiliations
Funding This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or non-for-profit sectors.
Further Information

Publication History

29 April 2019

03 July 2019

Publication Date:
05 August 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the paranasal sinuses is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, making curative therapy difficult. The goal of this study was to evaluate the management and outcomes of patients with SCC treated at our institution.

Methods In a population-based consecutive prospective cohort, we conducted an analysis of all patients treated for SCC between 1988 and 2017.

Results A total of 72 patients were included, follow-up was 100%. Mean follow-up was 57 months for the entire cohort, and 108 months for patients with no evidence of disease. Eighty-two percent of all patients had high-stage (T4) disease. Fifty-seven patients underwent treatment with curative intent; consisting of surgery with or without oncologic treatment in 34, and of oncologic treatment only in 23 cases. Fifteen patients received palliative treatment. The rates of overall survival for the entire cohort were 55% at 2, 41% at 5, and 32% at 10 years, and corresponding disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 55, 45, and 34%, respectively. DSS rates after surgical treatment with curative intent were 81% at 2, 65% at 5, and 54% at 10 years. Retromaxillary involvement and nonradical surgery were negative prognostic factors. Best survival was achieved with the combination of radical surgery and adjuvant oncologic treatment.

Conclusion Surgical resection with a curative intent yielded 65% at 5-year DSS even in this cohort of patients with high-stage SCC and is still considered as the treatment of choice, preferably in combination with adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy.