CC BY 4.0 · European J Pediatr Surg Rep 2019; 07(01): e104-e109
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694060
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Infantile Abdominal and Pelvic Lipoblastomas: A Case Series

Riccardo Guanà
1  Division of Pediatric Surgery, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Turin, Italy
,
Salvatore Garofalo
2  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Luisa Ferrero
2  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Maria Grazia Cortese
3  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Piazza Polonia, Turin, Italy
,
Luca Lonati
2  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Elisabetta Teruzzi
2  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Eleonora Basso
4  Department of Paediatric Haematology-Oncology, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Isabella Morra
5  Department of Anatomo-Pathology, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin, Piemonte, Italy
,
Riccardo Lemini
6  Surgery, Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic Hospital Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
,
Nicola Sardi
7  Department of Paediatrics, Ospedale SS Annunziata di Savigliano, Savigliano, Piemonte, Italy
,
Fabrizio Gennari
1  Division of Pediatric Surgery, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Turin, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

10 December 2018

18 June 2019

Publication Date:
28 November 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Lipoblastomas are rare benign mesenchymal tumors that arise from embryonal fat cells.

They are usually discovered in infants and children under 3 years of age, and mostly occur in the trunk (from 10 to 60%, depending on the study) and extremities (from 40 to 45%), while head and neck localizations are rare, with only five cases described to date.

We report on three cases of lipoblastomas in infants younger than 4 years, with unusual localizations: one intra-abdominal, discovered during a laparotomy for an intussusception; one pelvic, misdiagnosed as an ovarian mass; and one gluteal with a pelvic extension.

All children underwent magnetic resonance imaging as preoperative workup. All tumors were completely resected with free surgical margins and ultrasonographic follow-up was uneventful for all patients.