CC BY 4.0 · European J Pediatr Surg Rep 2019; 07(01): e75-e78
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694058
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Pediatric Adrenal Masses—Report on Four Cases

Ahmed ElHaddad
1  Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
,
Christoph Castellani
1  Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
,
Erich Sorantin
2  Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Styria, Austria
,
Martin Benesch
3  Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
,
Eva Kampelmühler
4  Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
,
Georg Singer
1  Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
,
Holger Till
1  Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 December 2018

18 June 2019

Publication Date:
31 October 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

The dignity of adrenal masses in children varies from benign lesions like adenoma and ganglioneuroma to malignant tumors like adrenocortical carcinoma and neuroblastoma. Any surgical approach, especially minimally invasive surgery (MIS), requires careful risk stratification based on oncological and technical criteria. Herein, we present four patients who underwent MIS for adrenal masses. Laboratory testing differentiated between simple cysts and adenoma, but could not identify a child with adrenocortical tumor preoperatively. Analysis of image-defined risk factors excluded vascular encasement in all cases. All patients underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy without complications. Histopathology revealed simple cyst, ganglioneuroblastoma, adenoma, and potentially malignant adrenocortical tumor in one patient/case each. All specimen showed clear margins and no recurrence was noted at a mean follow-up of 18 months.