Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(11): 1177-1182
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692684
Original Article

Effects of Partially Hydrolyzed Formula on Severity and Outcomes of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Mahdi Alsaleem
1  Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
,
Sara K. Berkelhamer
1  Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
,
Gregory E. Wilding
2  Department of Biostatistics, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
,
Lorin M. Miller
2  Department of Biostatistics, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
,
Anne Marie Reynolds
1  Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective This study compares the effect of partially hydrolyzed formula (PHF) and standard formula (SF) on the severity and short-term outcomes of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

Study Design We performed a retrospective chart review of 124 opioid-dependent mothers and their term or near-term infants. Infants were categorized according to the predominant type of formula consumed during the hospital stay. Finnegan's scale was used to assess symptoms of withdrawal.

Results A total of 110 infants met our inclusion criteria. Thirty-four (31%) infants were fed predominantly PHF, 60 (54%) infants were fed SF, and 16 (15%) infants were fed maternal breast milk. There was no difference between the infants in the PHF and SF groups with respect to requirement of morphine (MSO4) therapy, maximum dose of MSO4 used, duration of MSO4 treatment or length of hospital stay after performing multivariate analyses to control for type of drug used by the mother, maternal smoking, regular prenatal care, inborn status, and maximum Finnegan score prior to MSO4 treatment.

Conclusion Use of PHF failed to impact short-term outcomes in infants treated for NAS including maximum MSO4 dose, duration of MSO4 treatment, and length of hospital stay. A prospective randomized controlled trial may be indicated to confirm this finding.

Note

Statistical analysis reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under award Number UL1TR001412.




Publication History

Received: 14 April 2019

Accepted: 09 May 2019

Publication Date:
25 June 2019 (online)

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