CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Thromb Haemost 2019; 119(08): 1222-1236
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692680
Theme Issue Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Long Noncoding RNAs of the Arterial Wall as Therapeutic Agents and Targets in Atherosclerosis

Lesca M. Holdt
1  Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
,
Alexander Kohlmaier
1  Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
,
Daniel Teupser
1  Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was in part funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) as part of the Collaborative Research Center CRC1123 “Atherosclerosis - Mechanisms and Networks of Novel Therapeutic Targets” (project B1) and by the Leducq-foundation CADgenomics.
Further Information

Publication History

15 November 2018

23 April 2019

Publication Date:
16 July 2019 (eFirst)

  

Abstract

Long noncoding ribonucleic acids (lncRNAs) have been defined as transcripts which are > 200 ribonucleotides in size and are not translated into protein. Recent work has shown that many lncRNAs do have specific molecular functions and biological effects, and are involved in a growing number of diseases, including atherosclerosis. As a consequence, lncRNAs are also becoming interesting targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we focus on lncRNAs which are expressed in the arterial wall, and describe potential RNA therapeutic approaches of atherosclerosis by manipulating lncRNAs without affecting genome deoxyribonucleic acid content: Starting out with an overview of all lncRNAs that have so far been implicated in atherosclerosis by in vivo studies, we describe methodologies for their activation, inactivation, and RNA sequence manipulation. We continue by addressing how artificial (nonnative) therapeutic lncRNAs may be designed, and which molecular functions these designer lncRNAs may exploit. We conclude with an outlook on approaches for chemical lncRNA modification, RNA mass production, and site-specific therapeutic delivery.