Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(06): 492-498
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692637
Clinical Communication
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Clinical Findings, Treatments and Outcomes in Farm Animals with Vertebral Fractures or Luxations: 22 Cases (2006–2017)

1  Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, Unites States
,
Amy L. Johnson
1  Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, Unites States
,
Thomas P. Schaer
1  Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, Unites States
,
Marie-Eve Fecteau
1  Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, Unites States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

12 November 2018

08 May 2019

Publication Date:
26 June 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to describe the signalment, clinical presentation, diagnostic findings, medical and surgical treatment and outcome of 22 farm animals diagnosed with a vertebral fracture or luxation.

Study design Medical records of 22 farm animals (7 goats, 6 alpacas, 5 cattle, 3 sheep and 1 deer) were reviewed for signalment, history, presenting clinical signs and neurological examination findings, clinicopathological results, diagnostic imaging, final diagnosis, medical and surgical management, clinical progression and outcome.

Results Animals' age ranged from 1 day to 15 years. Neurological examination findings included decreased motor function (20/22), recumbency (14/22), altered mentation (13/22), cranial nerve deficits (4/22) and lack of nociception (3/22). Lesions were localized to the atlanto-occipital region (2/22), C1 to C5 (7/22), C6 to T2 (4/22), T3 to L3 (3/22), and L4 to S1 (6/22). Diagnoses included vertebral fracture only (4/22), luxation only (5/22) or both vertebral fracture and luxation (13/22). In five cases, no therapy was attempted, while 12 cases were treated medically and five cases were treated surgically. Surgical interventions included manual reduction (n = 1); arthrodesis (n = 2); laminectomy (n = 1); and laminectomy with pin fixation, cerclage wire and polymethylmethacrylate bridging (n = 1). Five of the 22 cases survived to hospital discharge; two of these were treated surgically.

Conclusion The cervical region was most commonly affected. Prognosis for these injuries in farm animals is guarded.

Author Contribution

S. Boorman and M. Fecteau were responsible for study conception. All authors were responsible for study design, acquisition of data, data analysis and interpretation, revising of the manuscript and are publicly accountable for relevant content. All authors gave final approval of the submitted manuscript.


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