CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) 2019; 54(03): 322-328
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692447
Artigo Original | Original Article
Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia. Published by Thieme Revnter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Prospective Study on the Impact of the Use of Human Fibrin Sealant free of Clot-Stabilizing Agents in Total Knee Arthroplasty[*]

Article in several languages: português | English
1  Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
,
Guilherme Mathias Palhares
1  Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
,
Rodrigo Satamini Pires e Albuquerque
1  Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
,
Eduardo Branco de Sousa
1  Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
,
João Maurício Barretto
1  Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 February 2018

10 July 2018

Publication Date:
27 June 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the results of the intraoperative topical use of a human fibrin sealant free of clot-stabilizing agents in total knee arthroplasties (TKAs), looking for differences between groups regarding blood loss, transfusion requirement, length of hospital stay, pain perception, range of motion (ROM), and incidence of complications.

Methods We have analyzed prospectively an intervention group with 32 patients (Sealant) and a control group with 31 patients (Control) with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA.

Results The results were similar between the groups regarding visible blood loss in the drain in 24 hours (Control, 276.5 mL ± 46.24 versus Sealant, 365.9 mL ± 45.73), total blood loss in 24 hours (Control, 930 mL ± 78 versus Sealant, 890 mL ± 67) and in 60 hours after surgery (Control, 1,250 mL ± 120 versus Sealant, 1,190 mL ± 96), blood transfusion requirement (which occurred only in 1 control patient), length of hospital days stay (Control, 5.61 ± 0.50 versus Sealant, 4.81 ± 0.36), postoperative pain, and ROM. Sealant use was not related to wound healing complications, to infection, or to deep venous thrombosis.

Conclusion We have concluded that the hemostatic agent composed of human fibrin was not effective in reducing bleeding volume and blood transfusion requirement, nor it interfered with hospital length of stay, pain perception, and ROM. Its use was not related to any complications.

* Work performed at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia Jamil Haddad, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.