Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(S 04): A13-A24
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692276
Podium Abstracts
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Gastrocnemius Muscle-Tendon Unit Tension Affects Cranial Tibial Translation

M. Maynard
1  University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States
,
A.S. Kapatkin
2  Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States
,
T.C. Garcia
1  University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States
,
O. Winson
3  Solano-Napa Pet Emergency Clinic, Fairfield, California, United States
,
S.M. Stover
4  School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
07 August 2019 (online)

 

Introduction: Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is a leading cause of canine lameness. The circumstances that promote CrCL injury remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit (GMT) tension induced by tarsal flexion plays a role in generating cranial tibial translation (CTT) in the CrCL-deficient stifle.

Materials and Methods: The effects of stifle and hock angles on CrCL length, CTT, and GMT length in intact and CrCL-deficient cadaveric canine pelvic limbs (n = 10) were measured by tracking fiduciary markers in the attachments of the CrCL and GMT during in vitro loading (20% body weight) of limb specimens at 3 stifle and 3 tarsal angles. Repeated measures ANOVA assessed the effects of CrCL condition (intact, cut), limb load (unloaded, loaded), and stifle flexion (80, 100, and 120°), tarsal flexion (90, 110, and 130°) angles on CrCL length, CTT, and GMT length.

Results: Mean CrCL length was longer in loaded CrCL-deficient limbs only in combined tarsal flexion and stifle extension (p = 0.018). Tarsal flexion had a large effect on GMT length, particularly in combination with stifle extension (p < 0.001). CTT was greater with stifle extension (p < 0.001), and with tarsal flexion (p < 0.001).

Discussion/Conclusion: The data support the hypothesis that CrCL-deficient canine stifles exhibit greater CTT due to GMT tension induced by tarsal flexion. Whole limb biomechanics should be considered in approaches to treatment of CrCL disruption.

Acknowledgment: Center for Companion Animal Health, Students Training in Advanced Research, and Veterinary Student Scholars Program, Morris Animal Foundation. There are no conflicts of interest.