Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(05): 394-400
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1688985
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Diagnostic Ultrasound Detection of Changes in Femoral Muscle Mass Recovery after Tibial Plateau Levelling Osteotomy in Dogs

Ilan Frank
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States
,
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States
,
Brian Zanghi
2  Nestlé Purina Research, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
,
Rondo Middleton
2  Nestlé Purina Research, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
,
Linda Lang
3  Department of Environmental & Radiological Health Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Funding for this project was provided by Nestlé Purina PetCare.
Further Information

Publication History

17 October 2018

27 March 2019

Publication Date:
29 May 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective The goal of this study was to develop a clinically feasible ultrasound (US) protocol that can detect changes in thigh muscle mass in dogs after stifle surgery. The primary aim of this study was to compare previously described US measurement locations of the canine thigh for detecting changes in muscle mass in dogs recovering from tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO).

Study Design This was a prospective, exploratory pilot study. Adult dogs (n = 7) undergoing pet-owner elected TPLO were enrolled. Twelve different US measurements were performed in triplicate by a single experienced observer. Measurements were performed at 0, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after surgery at a proximal and distal location along the femur. Data from all available time points and locations were analysed for the main effect of time within modalities.

Results A total of 1,008 US measurements were performed. Measurements of the transverse sectional area of the rectus femoris muscle detected significant (p  ≤  0.05) muscle loss between weeks 0 and 2 at the lateral and medial aspects of the distal location (19% and 15% respectively). Measurements of the thigh muscle thickness were significantly (p < 0.01) increased between 2nd- and 8th- week time points at the lateral aspect of the proximal location (26%).

Conclusion The proximal femoral location, measured from the lateral aspect, appears to be the most suitable US measurement for detecting increases in femoral muscle mass in dogs recovering from TPLO. The provided pilot data suggest that further research evaluating this outcome measure is indicated.

Author Contribution

Ilan Frank, Felix Duerr and Linda Lang contributed to the study conception, the study design, the acquisition of data, data analysis and interpretation, drafting or revising of the manuscript, and approved the submitted manuscript. Brian Zanghi and Rondo Middleton contributed to the study conception, the study design, data analysis and interpretation, drafting or revising of the manuscript, and approved the submitted manuscript.


Supplementary Material