J Pediatr Neurol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1685468
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Acetazolamide-Induced Aseptic Meningitis in a Female Adolescent with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: A Case Report

Rekha Gupta
1  Novak Center, Louisville. Kentucky, United States
2  Norton Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
3  Division of Child Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
,
Chris Barton
1  Novak Center, Louisville. Kentucky, United States
2  Norton Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
3  Division of Child Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
,
Vinay Puri
1  Novak Center, Louisville. Kentucky, United States
2  Norton Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
3  Division of Child Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

08 February 2019

07 March 2019

Publication Date:
16 April 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) has been documented for many years and is considered a diagnostic and patient management challenge. Associated medications include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and monoclonal antibodies, but no cases associated with acetazolamide have been reported. We briefly review a case of a 15-year-old female patient with history of idiopathic intracranial hypertension whose symptoms of aseptic meningitis associated with the use and increase of acetazolamide. DIAM should be considered a possibility in any patient with meningeal symptoms, pleocytosis, and negative cerebrospinal fluid culture. This is the first known case linking acetazolamide to DIAM.

Financial Disclosure

No authors have financial relationships relevant to this article to disclose.


Author Contribution

Rekha Gupta reviewed the literature, drafted the initial manuscript, and reviewed and revised the manuscript. Dr Barton critically reviewed, edited, and revised the manuscript. Dr Puri was principally involved in the case, as well as critically reviewed, edited, and revised the manuscript. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work.