Thromb Haemost 2019; 119(06): 962-970
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1681100
Stroke, Systemic or Venous Thromboembolism
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Alcohol Consumption and Risk of First-Time Venous Thromboembolism in Men and Women

1  Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Skellefteå Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
,
Lars Johansson
1  Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Skellefteå Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
,
Maria Wennberg
2  Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
,
Marcus Lind
1  Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Skellefteå Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
› Author Affiliations
Funding We acknowledge the Northern Sweden Diet Database and the funds supporting it, including the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) and the Västerbotten County Council. We also acknowledge the Joint Committee of Northern Sweden Health Care Region, and the Foundation for Medical Research in Skellefteå for their generous support.
Further Information

Publication History

01 October 2018

20 January 2019

Publication Date:
21 March 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background The relationship between alcohol intake and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unclear. Men and women differ in their drinking habits, which may affect a possible association.

Objective This article investigates the association between alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence and VTE in the total population as well as in men and women separately.

Methods We performed a prospective, population-based cohort study in northern Sweden. Study participants were 108,025 (51% women) persons aged 30 to 60 years who underwent a health examination between 1985 and 2014. We assessed alcohol consumption and defined alcohol dependence using a questionnaire. The outcome was a validated first-time VTE.

Results The mean follow-up time was 13.9 years, and 2,054 participants had a first-time VTE. The mean alcohol consumption was 3.5 standard drinks weekly in men and 1.5 in women. Alcohol dependence was found in 10% of men and 3% of women. There was an association between alcohol consumption (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–1.03 per standard drink weekly) as well as alcohol dependence (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.06–1.52) and VTE after adjustments. In men, the risk of VTE increased over quartiles of weekly alcohol consumption (p for trend 0.02), with a HR of 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01–1.47) for the highest quartile. Alcohol dependence was associated with VTE in men (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07–1.59). In women, there were no significant associations.

Conclusion High alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence were associated with increased risk of first-time VTE in men, but not in women.

Supplementary Material