J Neurol Surg B
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1679889
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Mental Health Disorders Associated with Sinonasal and Skull Base Malignancies: A Large Cohort Study

Ji Hyae Lee
1  The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Brad E. Zacharia
2  Department of Neurosurgery, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Djibril Ba
3  Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Douglas Leslie
3  Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Guodong Liu
3  Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Neerav Goyal
4  Division of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding No external funding was received.
Further Information

Publication History

01 May 2018

28 December 2018

Publication Date:
19 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective The main purpose of this article is to examine the prevalence, incidence, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics of mental health disorders (MHDs) among patients with skull base malignancies.

Design Retrospective cohort study.

Settings/Participants Six-thousand seven-hundred sixty sinonasal/skull base cancer patients in the MarketScan database between 2005 and 2014.

Main Outcome Measures Frequency of MHDs pre- and post-diagnosis in patients harboring sinonasal/skull base malignancies.

Results A significant increase in MHDs was noted from pre- to post-cancer diagnosis (22 vs 31%, p < 0.0001). Despite an increase in the prevalence rate, the demographic profile of patients with MHDs post-diagnosis remained similar to pre-diagnosis. Those patients harboring MHDs were, however, more likely to be women (62.7 vs 47.4%), and carry a history of smoking (40.9 vs 26.3%) than those without MHDs. These comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion The prevalence of MHDs increases following a diagnosis of a sinonasal/skull base malignancy. Patients with MHDs were more likely to be women and smokers.

Supplementary Material