Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(02): 165-170
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1677747
Clinical Communication
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

A Standing Percutaneous Technique for Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Arthrodesis in Twelve Horses (2014–2017)

Kyle Heaton
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, United States
,
Kelly D. Farnsworth
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, United States
,
Camila R. S. Souza
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, United States
,
Andrew R. E. Jones
2  San Luis Rey Equine Hospital, Bonsall, California, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.
Further Information

Publication History

10 April 2018

04 December 2018

Publication Date:
07 March 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objectives This report describes the use of a minimally invasive standing pastern arthrodesis technique for the treatment of osteoarthritis in horses and documents its clinical outcome in 12 horses.

Materials and Methods Medical records and radiographs of horses diagnosed with proximal interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis that underwent standing pastern arthrodesis using transarticular screws were reviewed. Follow-up information for determination of outcome was obtained via phone interview with the owners.

Results Twelve horses (15 limbs) were included in the study. Radiographical findings revealed severe osteoarthritis in 12/15 limbs and moderate osteoarthritis in 3/15 limbs. Follow-up information was available for 11/12 cases (13/15 limbs). Phone surveys with the owners revealed that 8/11 horses were performing at their previous activity level or higher. Two horses remained lame. One horse developed a surgical site infection and was euthanatized. The average time for horses to return to their previous level of activity was 6.5 months (range: 1–18 months).

Clinical Significance Stabilization of the proximal interphalangeal joint in horses with moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis can be performed using this minimally invasive standing technique. This procedure can be performed safely and provides a similar outcome when compared with other described techniques.

Authors' Contribution

All authors contributed to conception of study, study design, acquisition of data and data analysis and interpretation. All authors drafted, revised and approved the submitted manuscript.