Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(02): 104-111
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1677509
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Kinetic and Kinematic Analysis of Dogs Suffering from Hip Osteoarthritis and Healthy Dogs Across Different Physical Activities

Alexandre N. A. Souza
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
,
Andres S. A. Escobar
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
,
Bruno Germano
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
,
Claudia L. F. Farias
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
,
Luana F. F. Gomes
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
,
Julia M. Matera
1  Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 March 2018

21 November 2018

Publication Date:
08 February 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate mobility performance in dogs suffering from hip osteoarthritis secondary to hip dysplasia using kinesiology.

Materials and Methods Twenty dogs with a radiographical diagnosis of bilateral hip dysplasia and hip osteoarthritis and 20 healthy dogs were submitted to kinetic and kinematic analysis while climbing upstairs, walking down a slope, sitting down, standing up, and walking. Dogs were also scored by two blind examiners using a visual analog scale (VAS).

Results Dysplastic dogs had lower peak vertical force (4% of body weight on average), increased symmetry index (12.6% difference on average) and reduced maximum hip joint extension angle and range of motion (ROM) in all tests. Mean hip joint range of motion difference was 11, 20, 25.4 and 25.2 degrees (walking, climbing upstairs, walking down a slope, sitting down and standing up exercise respectively). The VAS scores varied widely between examiners; still, healthy and dysplastic dog mobility differed across all physical test tasks.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Gait changes were observed in all physical tasks performed by dysplastic dogs with hip osteoarthritis, particularly in those requiring higher levels of effort. Comprehensive, quantitative assessment of dogs suffering from hip osteoarthritis across a range of physical activities is recommended.

Authors' Contribution

ANAS and JMM designed this study with assistance of LFFG. ASAE and BG performed the blind examination. ANAS examined all dogs involved with assistance of CLFF. ANAS was responsible for kinetic data collection and analysis with assistance of ASAE, BG and CLFF. ANAS prepared this manuscript. This manuscript was read and approved by all authors involved.