Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(02): 097-103
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1677492
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Kinetic Gait Analysis of Agility Dogs Entering the A-Frame

Carla Appelgrein
1  School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
,
Mark R. Glyde
1  School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
,
Giselle Hosgood
1  School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
,
Alasdair R. Dempsey
2  School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
,
Sarah Wickham
1  School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
› Author Affiliations
Funding Funding, in part, was provided by the Canine Research Fund of the Australian National Kennel Council and the College of Veterinary Medicine, Murdoch University.
Further Information

Publication History

11 May 2018

19 November 2018

Publication Date:
31 January 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a decrease in the A-frame angle of incline on the vertical and cranio-caudal ground reaction forces observed in a homogeneous cohort of agility dogs during entrance and contact with the A-frame.

Materials and Methods A crossover study design was applied to eight large breed dogs to compare the vertical and cranio-caudal ground reaction forces entering the A-frame at three angles of incline: 40° (standard), 35° and 30°. The peak vertical force, passive impact peak, peak propulsive force, peak braking force, the time point (percentile) in the stance phase at which these events occurred and the proportion of time for limb contact spent in braking (% braking) and propulsion (% propulsion) were examined.

The variables measured from three trials at each incline were evaluated for a significant effect of A-frame angle with height and velocity included as covariates.

Results The peak propulsive force and the % propulsion were significantly higher at the 40° angle of incline compared with 30° (p = 0.013, p = 0.0165 respectively) and the % braking was significantly lower at the 40° angle of incline compared with 30° (p = 0.0165). There was no significant effect of A-frame angle on the vertical ground reaction forces measured.

Clinical Significance Compared with 30° incline, ascent up the A-frame at a 40° incline requires a higher propulsive force and extended time in propulsion to maintain forward movement and convert potential energy into forward kinetic energy.

Presentation

This study was presented at the Veterinary Orthopaedic Society (VOS) held at Snowbird, Utah from March 11-18, 2017.


Author Contribution

Carla Appelgrein, Mark R. Glyde, Giselle Hosgood and Alasdair R. Dempsey contributed to conception of study, study design, acquisition of data and data analysis and interpretation. All of them also drafted, revised and approved the submitted manuscript. Sarah Wickham contributed to acquisition of data and approved the submitted manuscript.