J Pediatr Infect Dis 2019; 14(03): 116-120
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1677484
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Waning Time of Maternally Derived Anti-Hepatitis A and Anti-Varicella Zoster Virus Antibodies

Zeliha Guzelkucuk
1  Department of Pediatrics, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
,
Aysu Duyan Camurdan
1  Department of Pediatrics, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
,
Ufuk Beyazova
1  Department of Pediatrics, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
,
Gulendam Bozdayı
2  Department of Microbiology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
,
Fusun Civil
3  Department of Public Health, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
,
Aylin Altay Kocak
2  Department of Microbiology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Funding Gazi University Scientific Research Projects Committee (project code: 01/2011-103).
Further Information

Publication History

11 June 2018

04 December 2018

Publication Date:
09 January 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the persistence of maternally derived antibodies to hepatitis A (anti-HAV) and varicella zoster (anti-VZV) viruses to determine the optimal time of vaccination of infants.

Materials and Methods This study was conducted between 2011 and 2012 at the Gazi University Hospital. Blood samples were collected from healthy infants' cord blood and at 12th, 18th, and 24th months of age. Anti-HAV and anti-VZV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit in blood samples.

Results A total of 546 infants and children were included in the study; all had blood samples taken at four time points (at birth [cord blood], and at 12, 18, and 24 months). Anti-HAV IgG seropositivity rates in these samples were 77.3, 29.6, 14.8, and 17.7%, respectively (p < 0.05). Corresponding anti-VZV IgG seropositivity rates were 83.3, 21.5, 29.5, and 33.8%, respectively (p < 0.05).

Conclusion Anti-HAV and anti-VZV seropositivity rates were lowest at 18 and 12 months, respectively. We suggest that if VZV and hepatitis A vaccines were included in the national vaccination program after the age of 1 year, there should be little interference from passively acquired maternal antibodies.

Authors' Contributions

Z.G. and A.D.C. conceived the study; A.D.C. and U.B. designed the study protocol; A.D.C. and Z.G. performed the clinical assessment; G.B. performed the immunoassays, F.C. performed the analysis and interpretation of these data. A.D.C. and Z.G. drafted the article; U.B. critically revised the article for intellectual content. All authors read and approved the final article. A.D.C. is the guarantor of the article.


Ethical Approval

This study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Gazi University Hospital (date/number: February 8, 2012/046).