Hamostaseologie 2019; 39(04): 347-354
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676128
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Impact of Telemedicine Tools on Record Keeping and Compliance in Haemophilia Care

A. Banchev*
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
2  Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital “Queen Giovanna – ISUL,” Sofia, Bulgaria
,
G. Goldmann*
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
N. Marquardt
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
C. Klein
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
S. Horneff
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
R. Langenkamp
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
T. Frankenberger
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
J. Oldenburg
1  Institute for Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

31 March 2018

31 October 2018

Publication Date:
17 January 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background Record keeping is integral to home treatment for haemophilia. Issues with paper diaries include questionable compliance, data validity and quality. Implementation of electronic diaries (e-diaries) in haemophilia patients could improve documentation of home treatment.

Aim This article evaluates the effects of an e-diary, Haemoassist, on recording and patient compliance with therapy.

Patients and Methods An explorative study was used to assess the sequential use of paper diaries and e-diaries by 99 patients with severe haemophilia A or B and 1 with severe factor VII deficiency. Median age was 41 years. Information was obtained from paper records for 3 years preceding the introduction of an electronic record system and the first 6 to 12 months of Haemoassist use. Data from the 3-year period were averaged. Missing data for rounded 12 months of e-diary use were extrapolated to correspond to a full year.

Results Enhancement of 23% in record delivery was observed for the period of Haemoassist use (p = 0.013). Twenty-one percent increase in patients’ compliance for data reporting (from 65% 35 to 86% 22, p = 0.003) and 16% increase for documentation of bleedings (from 68 to 84% of patients, p = 0.01) were detected. Compliance to prescribed therapy of patients for the whole studied period improved by 6% (from 82% ± 29 to 88% ± 25, p = 0.05). Major advances were demonstrated predominantly in the age groups of between 13 and 20 and 21 and 40 years.

Conclusion e-Diaries' use enables improved recording of information about patients' home treatment and bleeding episodes. Enhanced compliance with therapy may be a further benefit.

* A.B. and G.G contributed equally to this work.